Crush Ringtone

The Crush Ringtone by David Archuleta has quickly become one of the most popular ringtones in the world. It has peaked at # 1 on several popular mobile charts and is currently # 2 on the US iTunes Top Songs Chart. Based on its popularity, the ringtone might soon become one of the most popular mobile phone ringtones ever released!

Crush is the debut single by David Archuleta, American Idol seventh season runner-up. The track was written by Jess Cates, Dave Hodges, and Emanuel Kiriakou. A digital download of the song became available on August 12, 2008. After just one day of airplay, Crush was able to debut at # 93 on the Billboard Pop 100 and # 57 on Pop 100 Airplay. The song is also currently one of the most tracks at Mainstream CHR radio stations.Following the song's digital release onto the US iTunes store on August 12, 2008, the song rose to the # 1 spot on iTunes in less than 24 hours. Crush debuted on the Canadian iTunes store at # 2 and is expected to debut on the Billboard Hot 100 next week.

The popularity of the song has helped make it such a popular phone ringtone. The track has also topped Canadian and Australian music charts, making the ringtone very popular in those nations as well as in the United States.

There is no doubt that David Archuleta's incredible new hit single will end up being one of the most popular ringtones of 2008. If you're looking for a hot new ringtone for your mobile phone – the Crush Ringtone is an awesome choice!

Six Types of Training and Development Techniques

1.On-the-job Training and Lectures

The two most frequently used kinds of training are on-the-job training and lectures, although little research exists as to the effectiveness of either. It is usually impossible to teach someone everything she needs to know at a location away from the workplace. Thus on-the-job training often supplements other kinds of training, e.g., classroom or off-site training; but on-the-job training is frequently the only form of training. It is usually informal, which means, unfortunately, that the trainer does not concentrate on the training as much as she should, and the trainer may not have a well-articulated picture of what the novice needs to learn.

On-the-job training is not successful when used to avoid developing a training program, though it can be an effective part of a well-coordinated training program.

Lectures are used because of their low cost and their capacity to reach many people. Lectures, which use one-way communication as opposed to interactive learning techniques, are much criticized as a training device.

2. Programmed Instruction (PI)

These devices systematically present information to the learner and elicit a response; they use reinforcement principles to promote appropriate responses. When PI was originally developed in the 1950s, it was thought to be useful only for basic subjects. Today the method is used for skills as diverse as air traffic control, blueprint reading, and the analysis of tax returns.

3. Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI)

With CAI, students can learn at their own pace, as with PI. Because the student interacts with the computer, it is believed by many to be a more dynamic learning device. Educational alternatives can be quickly selected to suit the student’s capabilities, and performance can be monitored continuously. As instruction proceeds, data are gathered for monitoring and improving performance.

4. Audiovisual Techniques

Both television and film extend the range of skills that can be taught and the way information may be presented. Many systems have electronic blackboards and slide projection equipment. The use of techniques that combine audiovisual systems such as closed circuit television and telephones has spawned a new term for this type of training, teletraining. The feature on ” Sesame Street ” illustrates the design and evaluation of one of television’s favorite children’s program as a training device.

5. Simulations

Training simulations replicate the essential characteristics of the real world that are necessary to produce both learning and the transfer of new knowledge and skills to application settings. Both machine and other forms of simulators exist. Machine simulators often have substantial degrees of. physical fidelity; that is, they represent the real world’s operational equipment. The main purpose of simulation, however, is to produce psychological fidelity, that is, to reproduce in the training those processes that will be required on the job. We simulate for a number of reasons, including to control the training environment, for safety, to introduce feedback and other learning principles, and to reduce cost.

6. Business games

They are the direct progeny of war games that have been used to train officers in combat techniques for hundreds of years. Almost all early business games were designed to teach basic business skills, but more recent games also include interpersonal skills. Monopoly might be considered the quintessential business game for young capitalists. It is probably the first place youngsters learned the words mortgage, taxes, and go to jail.

How Many Times Have You Had A Jewelry Dilemma

Which necklace style is appropriate with this outfit? Should I use a long necklace or a short necklace will be better suited? The following list describes the most common necklace lengths and how to use them.

Collar – 12-13 inches in length

Collars are usually made up of two or more strands and lie snugly on the middle of the neck. Collars are an ideal complement to elegant V-neck, boat neck or off the shoulder fashions.

Choker – 14-16 inches in length

A choker is despite the most classic and versatile of all the single strand lengths and is designed to lie around the base of the neck. It is appropriate with everything from casual to formal eveningwear, and completes any neckline imaginable. Is the perfect length to add subtle elegance to your workday paired with a button-down shirt, yet just as stylish with a cocktail dress. This is a good necklace length for a child. This way the necklace has "growth room".

Princess – 17-19 inches in length

The princess length necklace is best suited for crew and high necklines. It also fulfills low plunging necklines. This is an excellent choice if you are not certain which strand length is most appropriate and is the perfect necklace length for a pendant.

Matinee – 20-24 inches in length

The matinee necklace is the right choice for casual or business dressing. It looks best with high necklines and adds sophistication to a professional look. The matinee length is also very well suited for fancier wear such as long sundresses and formal gowns. The extra length of the matinee necklace gives the wearer a sense of luxury and confidence. It certainly may dress up an outfit.

Opera – 28-34 inches in length

The opera necklace offers many attractive options. Can be worn as a single strand, it is refined and perfect for high or crew necklines. Can be doubled upon itself and serves as a versatile two-strand choker. It can be knotted at the neckline or above the bust to create a stylish vintage look. Traditionally, opera length necklaces are worn with eveningwear, although can be used to accessorize more casual attires.

Rope or Lariat – Over 45 inches in length

The rope necklace is very elegant and dangerously sexy. It can be made with several clasps placed in strategic locations, enabling it to be broken down into different necklace and bracelet combinations, or doubled and even tripled to create a stunning multi-strand choker. This versatile length may also be tied in a knot for a charming modern look. Ropes can also be knotted and slung over the shoulder to accentuate the beauty of a backless dress. Lariats are at last 48 inches long, with the ends left unattached for knotting or wrapping around the neck.

Now that you know all about necklaces lengths make sure you include all of them in your wardrobe so you do not have to worry about not having the right one when you need it.

Work and Study

The relationship between work and study should not be underestimated.

It is important that youngsters in general, and teenagers in particular, get real life experience of what it takes to succeed in the ‘real world’, what it takes to make money, and how hard dad or mum have to work to earn those extra few cents.

Recently a dad talked about the problems of getting his son to study; the family is wealthy and the son saw little need to make any effort to revise, do well in his forthcoming exams, and move onto a university and undergraduate subject with prospects of a rewarding career.

He saw his parents, particularly mum, as a ‘soft touch’.

The harder the concerned parents tried, the more obstinate the son became; the inverse law of proportionality seemed to be at work, or perhaps the law of diminishing returns. Necessity was definitely not the mother of invention!

‘Man he is a Lazy B…!’ complained the father.

At school, the youngster seemed to have learnt a lot about his ‘rights’ – but little about responsibility.

He didn’t realise that ‘rights’ and ‘responsibilities’ are the same bedfellows – they both start with the letter ‘r’!

The current situation was inevitable…

Things changed, however, after our recommendation that the son spend time working in the kitchens of one his father’s famous restaurants over the summer holidays (well, what else did he expect given his parents’ gentler efforts?).

Washing plates to earn his pocket-money was no fun; it didn’t take long before the grades started to improve.

Study was clearly a better option than washing plates in the kitchen.

Take Warren Buffet, one of the richest men in the world.

Warren has a wise head on his shoulders and drives the same old car and lives in the same old house as he did at the start of his career; his common sense has to be respected since his actions reflect his words.

He can afford to live in mansions, drive better cars but through his example has made clear that he intends to give most of his wealth to charity.

Warren believes that his children must learn to earn a living, make their own way in the real world.

The last thing he wants is to ‘handicap’ his progeny by handing over his billions.

Some of the smartest students at The University of Oxford in The Business Management School often spent their summer holidays waiting at tables before they got First Class Honours.

They are now CEOs of major companies, earning a very healthy living.

Consider another example from the world of tennis, the William sisters where Venus and Serena dominated the women’s game for many years.

Their early history is one of being introduced to the ‘Bronx’ by their dad where gang bullets were not uncommon whilst they trained.

The William sisters soon realized that working for success in tennis was a better option than living in ghettos.

Where cajoling fails, direct experience often succeeds.

If you want your children to study more effectively, let them work for it!